ON MY SIDE VS. YOUR SIDE

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Here’s the USA. And Mexico. And the underwhelming line in between. As much drama as there is surrounding this place as a concept, it’s pretty anticlimactic in person.

I’ve been working on a campaign centered on finding common ground. Timely, right?

It feels easier than ever to be focused on ‘your side versus their side.’ If somebody wearing your team colors does four good things and three terrible things, it can be so easy to make excuses for why those three things were actually good.

This mentality serves sports teams well. And at some point in human history, it probably helped tribes survive the brutality of previous eras. But a more fitting analogy now is that we’re all passengers on the same train, residents of a common home.

We could do a lot better if we set bigger goals for ourselves than “beat the other team.” If we changed our view from trying to sort people into good guys and bad guys and instead wondered what works of art we could make, what diseases we could cure, or what stories we could leave behind. History proves we are productive as heck when we work together, and destructive as hell when we don’t.

Philippe Lazaroideal, ideal1